Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Alfred Hitchcock Quotes

His Amazing Speches:

There is a dreadful story that I hate actors. Imagine anyone hating James Stewart...Jack Warner. I can't imagine how such a rumor began. Of course it may possibly because I was once quoted as saying that actors are cattle. My actor friends know I would never be capable of such a thoughtless, rude and unfeeling remark, that I would never call them cattle... What I probably said was that actors should be treated like cattle.

Discussion on his cameos: One of the earliest of these was in The Lodger (1927), the story of Jack the Ripper. My appearance called for me to walk up the stairs of the rooming house. Since my walk-ons in subsequent pictures would be equally strenuous - boarding buses, playing chess, etc. - I asked for a stunt man. Casting, with an unusual lack of perception, hired this fat man!

The length of a film should be directly related to the endurance of the human bladder.

To me Psycho was a comedy, it had to be.

Always make the audience suffer as much as possible.

Drama is life with the dull bits left out.

When he received his Irving Thalberg Award, he made this incredible long speech: Thank you!

When he accepted the American Film Institute Life Achievement award: I beg permission to mention by name only four people who have given me the most affection, appreciation, and encouragement, and constant collaboration. The first of the four is a film editor, the second is a scriptwriter, the third is the mother of my daughter Pat [Patricia Hitchcock], and the fourth is as fine a cook as ever performed miracles in a domestic kitchen. And their names are Alma Reville.

Some films are slices of life, mine are slices of cake.

I was an uncommonly unattractive young man.

It's only a movie, and, after all, we're all grossly overpaid.

There is nothing quite so good as a burial at sea. It is simple, tidy, and not very incriminating.

From his film Topaz (1969): Claude Jade is a brave nice young lady. But I don't give any guarantee what she will do on a taxi's back seat.

You can't direct a Laughton picture. The best you can hope for is to referee.

The paperback is very interesting but I find it will never replace the hardcover book -- it makes a very poor doorstop.

Film your murders like love scenes, and film your love scenes like murders.

I am a typed director. If I made Cinderella (1937), the audience would immediately be looking for a body in the coach.

If it's a good movie, the sound could go off and the audience would still have a perfectly clear idea of what was going on.

A good film is when the price of the dinner, the theater admission and the babysitter were worth it.

In feature films the director is God; in documentary films God is the director.

Discussing The Birds (1963): You know, I've often wondered what the Audubon Society's attitude might be to this picture.

Cary Grant is the only actor I ever loved in my whole life.

Walt Disney has the best casting. If he doesn't like an actor he just tears him up.

Blondes make the best victims. They're like virgin snow that shows up the bloody footprints.

I am scared easily, here is a list of my adrenaline-production: 1: small children, 2: policemen, 3: high places, 4: that my next movie will not be as good as the last one.

When an actor comes to me and wants to discuss his character, I say, "It's in the script". If he says, "But what's my motivation?", I say, "Your salary".

I don't understand why we have to experiment with film. I think everything should be done on paper. A musician has to do it, a composer. He puts a lot of dots down and beautiful music comes out. And I think that students should be taught to visualize. That's the one thing missing in all this. The one thing that the student has got to do is to learn that there is a rectangle up there - a white rectangle in a theater - and it has to be filled.

To make a great film you need three things - the script, the script and the script.

North By Northwest: Our original title, you know, was "The Man in Lincoln's Nose". Couldn't use it, though. They also wouldn't let us shoot people on Mount Rushmore. Can't deface a national monument. And it's a pity, too, because I had a wonderful shot in mind of Cary Grant hiding in Lincon's nose and having a sneezing fit.

I made a remark a long time ago. I said I was very pleased that television was now showing murder stories, because it's bringing murder back into its rightful setting - in the home.

Discussing his lifelong fear of eggs (medical term "ovophobia"): I'm frightened of eggs, worse than frightened, they revolt me. That white round thing without any holes... have you ever seen anything more revolting than an egg yolk breaking and spilling its yellow liquid? Blood is jolly, red. But egg yolk is yellow, revolting. I've never tasted it.

Fear isn't so difficult to understand. After all, weren't we all frightened as children? Nothing has changed since Little Red Riding Hood faced the big bad wolf. What frightens us today is exactly the same sort of thing that frightened us yesterday. It's just a different wolf. This fright complex is rooted in every individual.

Psycho Discussion: It has been rumored that Psycho is so terrifying that it will scare some people speechless. Some of my men hopefully sent their wives to a screening. The women emerged badly shaken but still vigorously vocal.

All love scenes started on the set are continued in the dressing room.

The man was a joker and here is why ;):  I once gave a dinner party, oh many years ago, where all the food was blue.

Psycho had a fake torso that squirted blood: But I never used it. It was all unnecessary because the cocking of the knife, the girl's face and the feet and everything was so rapid that there were 78 separate pieces of film in 45 seconds.

I wanted once to do a scene, for North by Northwest (1959) by the way, and I couldn't get it in there. I wanted it to be in Detroit, and two men walking along in front of an assembly line. And behind them you see the automobile being put together. It starts with a frame, and you just take the camera along, the two men are talking. And you know all those cars are eventually driven off the line, they load them with gas and everything. And one of the men goes forward, mind you you've seen a car from nothing, just a frame, opens the door and a dead body falls out.

AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Speech (well part of it): Had the beautiful Ms. Reville [his wife Alma] not accepted a lifetime contract without options as Mrs. Alfred Hitchcock some 53 years ago, Mr. Alfred Hitchcock might be in this room tonight, not at this table but as one of the slower waiters on the floor.

Reality is something that none of us can stand, at any time.

I like stories with lots of psychology.

Everything's perverted in a different way.

Cartoonists have the best casting system. If they don't like an actor, they just tear him up.

The length of a film should be directly related to the endurance of the human bladder.

Four people are sitting around a table talking about baseball or whatever you like. Five minutes of it. Very dull. Suddenly, a bomb goes off. Blows the people to smithereens. What does the audience have? Ten seconds of shock. Now take the same scene and tell the audience there is a bomb under that table and will go off in five minutes. The whole emotion of the audience is totally different because you've given them that information. In five minutes time that bomb will go off. Now the conversation about baseball becomes very vital. Because they're saying to you, "Don't be ridiculous. Stop talking about baseball. There's a bomb under there." You've got the audience working.

1955 Alfred Hitchcock Presents: For those of you watching this show in the year 2000, write us a letter and tell us how things are going where you are.

If you've designed a picture correctly, the Japanese audience should scream at the same time as the Indian audience.

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